Thursday, April 4, 2013

Procambarus Vasquezae



Procambarus Vasquezae

Crayfish Name: Procambarus Vasquezae

Origin: Mexico

Description: When fully mature the male averages 7cm and the female 6cm. s crayfish species is a little shy, and would not hurt a fly. They do not attach other tank inhabitants nor do they feast on plants. They are omnivorous and are ideal for community tanks. Their young have a pearl bluish appearance. When mature this blue color fades and instead they will have a dark brown color.

Water Parameters: Are tolerant to different water parameters. Regular water changes would ensure a healthier and stronger cancer.

Sexing: The females have a broader tale and the males have bigger/ longer pincers including a gonopod.

Breeding: If the water parameters are favorable and there are good numbers of both sexes then nature will take its course.

Compatibility: They are not aggressive and will most likely live peacefully with other fish, shrimp and snails. Peaceful aquarium inhabitants and therefore ideal for community tanks




Procambarus Versutus










Procambarus Versutus

Common Name:  SLY CRAYFISH

Scientific Name:  Procambarus (Pennides) versutus (Hagen)

Origin: USA

Max body size: 7cm

Keeping: You can keep one pair in an aquarium of 60cmx30cm. Bigger tanks allow for a greater number of individuals. A wide range of pH and GH is possible as long as one avoids the extremes. Quite tolerant to a wide range of water conditions and quality.
Behaviour: like most crayfish these are omnivorous. However they are no great eaters and keeping them in a planted tank is possible, as long as one does not need a perfect tank and can live with the little damage they do.Intra-species aggression is not big, one can even raise most of the young ones in the adults' tank.
How to tell apart males from females: As usual (longer pincers, gonopods in males, broader tail in females)

Breeding: as usual

spread: rare

remark: get blue most easily. Does have something to do with diet I think. Color can change from brown to blue and back after each molt.


Rarity Ranks:  G5/S1

State Legal Status:  Rare

Federal Legal Status:  None

Description:  The Sly Crayfish is dorsally tan or brown with cream and black markings.  Striking cream-colored stripes run horizontally along the sides of the carapace and abdomen.  The rostrum bears spines lateral to the tip and has a central ridge (carina).  There are two distinctive cervical spines on either side of the carapace.  The claws are dark, but the tubercles on the claws are even darker.  The abdomen is brown and is covered with black blotches; these black markings form a horizontal band with irregular edges along the sides of the abdomen.  The areola is 2-3 times as long as broad and comprises 24 - 28 percent of the total length of the carapace.  Males of this species may reach a maximum total body length of over 90 mm (3.5 in).  Mature females are about the same size, but males have notably larger claws.

Similar Species:  The Sly Crayfish has a distinctive color pattern in life that makes it easy to distinguish from other crayfishes within in its range.  However, it may be difficult to distinguish from preserved specimens of the White Tubercled Crayfish (Procambarus spiculifer). The dark (vs. white) tubercles of the sly crayfish are a helpful character.

Habitat:  The Sly Crayfish has been found only in clear, free-flowing streams.  During the day they are usually found within debris, aquatic plants (e.g., Golden Club, Orontium aquaticum), and washed out root masses along the banks of sand-bottomed streams.  They move out over the sand to forage at night.  They may dig simple burrows into the banks of streams.  This species is usually found in low pH (acidic) streams, whereas the White Tubercled Crayfish is usually found in streams of near neutral pH.  High quality habitat for the Sly Crayfish occurs in Pine Knot Creek and other eastern tributaries of Upatoi Creek.

Diet:  No studies of the Sly Crayfish diet are known.  Crayfishes are considered opportunistic omnivores and likely feed on live and decaying vegetation, aquatic insect larvae, small fishes, and dead animal matter.

Life History:  The only life history information published is notes provided by Hobbs (1981).  Hobbs (1981) examined only five specimens from Georgia, but in Alabama and Florida he reported males in reproductive condition from all months of the year and egg-bearing females from April to June.  Stanton (2006) also collected males in reproductive condition throughout the year in Georgia, but rarely encountered egg-bearing females.

Survey Recommendations:  Disturbing the substrate around aquatic plants and debris upstream from a net is productive.  Because crayfish are typically more active at night, trapping may also be effective.

Range:  The Sly Crayfish is distributed within the Chattahoochee River system in Chattahoochee and Marion counties.  With the exception of a few small creeks draining directly into the Chattahoochee River from Fort Benning, Georgia, records of the Sly Crayfish are restricted to the Upatoi Creek system. This species is also found in creeks across southern Alabama and in the panhandle of Florida.

Threats:  The Sly Crayfish is threatened in Georgia by its small geographic range and land uses within that range.  The Chattahoochee County habitat lies within federal property, the Fort Benning Military Reservation.  This habitat has been well protected in the past, but could be threatened by increased military training occurring on base.  Two of the best Marion County localities have been impacted by recent highway construction.

Conservation and Management Recommendations:  Conserving populations of the Sly Crayfish will require general watershed-level conservation practices, such as protection of riparian zones and adherence to best management practices for forestry, agriculture, and highway construction.  Special efforts should be made to protect important populations in Black, Juniper, and Pine Knot Creeks and Fort Benning should include this species in future conservation planning efforts.  Non-native crayfishes should never be used for bait.  Instead, anglers should use crayfishes collected from the river system they will be fishing in and should never release unused bait crayfish back into Georgia waters.

Selected References:

Bouchard, R. W. 1976. Crayfishes and shrimps. In: H. Boschung, ed., Endangered and Threatened Plants and Animals of Alabama. Bulletin of the Alabama Museum of Natural History 2:13-20. Page 14.

Hagen, H. A. 1870. Monograph of the North American Astacidae.  Illustrated Catalogue of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College 3:117 p.

Hobbs, H. H., Jr. 1981. The crayfishes of Georgia, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology 318:1–549.

Stanton, G. E.  2006.  Evaluation of conservation status of six West Georgia, Chattahoochee-Flint River crayfish species. Report to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Natural Heritage Program, Social Circle, GA. 60 p.

Taylor, C. A., G. A. Schuster, J. E. Cooper, R. J. DiStefano, A. G. Eversole, P. Hamr, H. H. Hobbs III, H. W. Robison, C. E. Skelton, and R. F. Thoma,  2007.  A reassessment of the conservation status of crayfishes of the United States and Canada after 10+ years of increased awareness. Fisheries 32(8):372-389.

Author of species account:  George E. Stanton


Friday, March 30, 2012

Engaeus Granulatus

Engaeus Granulatu


Engaeus Granulatus 
 
Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Infraorder : Astacidea
Family : Parastacidae
Genus : Engaeus

Species : Engaeus Granulatus 

Engaeus granulatus is a Tasmanian endemic burrowing crayfish occupying a restricted distribution in the Central North. The specific name of the crayfish refers to the prominent granulations found on its claws, which makes it one of our more easily identified Engaeus species. Within its distribution, the species seldom exhibits the vigorous colonies that are often typical of the other named species in the genus. For this reason as well as the fact that this crayfish often occurs in areas that are experiencing considerable development with subsequent habitat loss, E. granulatus is probably even less secure than the other threatened species of Engaeus currently listed.

Engaeus granulatus has been assessed as Critically Endangered under criterion. This species is thought to have undergone a decline of 80% or greater in the last ten years. It has an estimated area of occupancy of less than 0.5 km² with a severely fragmented distribution. It is subject to a range of threats which are resulting in a continuing decline in the quality of habitat. A species recovery plan has been developed, however urgent action is needed to protect some of the remaining subpopulations as none are protected at the present time.

Countries / Native: Australia (Tasmania)

Habitat and Ecology:     This species occupies seeps, wetlands and stream banks in relatively undisturbed habitats. It is only rarely seen above ground or in standing water. This species is often found in clayey soils with deeper burrows than other Engaeus species. It is believed to eat rotting wood, detritus, root material and, occasionally, animal material. The dispersal of this species through waterways may be limited, leading to restricted ranges and a high degree of local speciation (Doran 1999). The largest male recorded was 25.5 mm carapace length, and mature females ranged form 18.8 to 29.6 mm carapace length. The largest non-reproductive female was 19.6 mm carapace length (Horwtiz 1990).

Range Description:     This species is endemic to central north Tasmania. It is found in an area running southwest from Port Sorell to the Railton area and north to Quoiba, near Devonport (Nelson 2003). The historical distribution of this species is difficult to determine. Based on the distribution and abundance of other burrowing crayfish, it is likely that this species was quite common throughout its range prior to its habitat becoming highly modified (Nelson 2003). This species has an estimated extent of occurrence of 515 km² (N. Doran pers. comm. 2009).  Surveys conducted in 2002-03 found that this species had a restricted, fragmented population with limited connectivity between populations. Occupancy within its range is estimated to be between 0.2 - 0.5 km² (Threatened Species Scientific Commitee 2004). This estimate is based on known locations, with a 10 m (0.2 km²) or 20 m (0.5 km²) buffer applied to waterways and suitable wet areas within each colony to give an overall estimate of potentially occupied habitat (Threatened Species Scientific Commitee 2004). This is thought to be a conservative estimate (Threatened Species Scientific Commitee 2004). It is still not clear how much available suitable habitat is unsampled (Threatened Species Scientific Commitee 2004). It is highly probable that known populations will remain isolated due to the modified environments separating them and the continuing threatening processes operating throughout the range of the species (Nelson 2003).

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

AstacoidesMadagascariensis

Astacoides Madagascariensis


Madagascar Freshwater Crayfish
Astacoides Madagascariensis
Madagascar Freshwater Crayfish
Madagascar Crayfish 
The "Macrophthalmes"

Kingdom:     Animalia
Phylum:     Arthropoda
Subphylum:     Crustacea
Class:     Malacostraca
Order:     Decapoda
Family:     Parastacidae
Genus:     Astacoides


Species :   Astacoides Madagascariensis, A Madagascariensis


Astacoides is a genus of freshwater crayfish endemic to Madagascar. The first specimens were brought to Europe in 1839, and seven species are now recognised, most of which are on the IUCN Red List. They are large and slow-growing, and are threatened by habitat loss and overexploitation by local people. They are only found in a relatively small part of the island, mostly in undisturbed upland areas. They belong to the Gondwana-distributed family Parastacidae, but their nearest relatives live in Australasia, there being no native crayfish in mainland Africa or India.


Astacoides Madagascariensis has been assessed as Data Deficient. This species has possibly undergone declines in abundance due to habitat degradation and loss. It is likely to undergo further declines in the future due to introduced species. This species is likely to qualify for a threat category, however there is no available estimate on the rate of population decline. Further research is needed to determine population decline before a more accurate assessment of conservation status can be made.

Astacoides Madagascariensis is endemic to Madagascar, and extends a little further north than that of any other Malagasy crayfishes. The distribution of this species lies at latitudes 18° to 21° S, longitudes 47° to 49° E. Type specimens were probably collected in the vicinity of Tananarive (Hobbs 1987). This species is found in the Toamasina and Antananarivo provinces (Boyko et al. 2005). This species has an estimated extent of occurrence of 3,697 km2.

Native : Madagascar

Crayfish are only found in a relatively small area of Madagascar, covering parts of Toamasina, Antananarivo, Fianarantsoa and Toliara provinces; the total area they inhabit is around 60,000 square kilometres (23,000 sq mi) and ranges from the Isaha valley south to the Hauts Plateaux (near Anjozorobe).[4] In common with other tropical crayfish, Astacoides only lives at higher altitudes, from 500 metres (1,600 ft) above sea level to 2,000 m (6,600 ft)

The presence of Astacoides on the island of Madagascar is difficult to explain. The other members of the family Parastacidae are found in South America and Australasia, suggesting a Gondwanan origin for the family. However, there are no native crayfish in either Africa or India, the two landmasses with the most recent connections to Madagascar in the geological past.The genus which shares the greatest similarities with Astacoides is the Tasmanian genus Astacopsis. Given the large distance between Tasmania and Madagascar, it has been suggested that although the freshwater crayfish are a monophyletic group, their common ancestor may have lived in the seas, with separate crayfish lineages colonising the rivers separately

Astacoides Betsileosensis

Astacoides Betsileosensis

Astacoides Betsileosensis
Largest Madagascar Crayfish
The "Macrophthalmes" 

Astacoides Betsileosensis
Astacoides Betsileosensis
Kingdom:     Animalia
Phylum:     Arthropoda
Subphylum:     Crustacea
Class:     Malacostraca
Order:     Decapoda
Family:     Parastacidae
Genus:     Astacoides
Species : Astacoides Betsileosensis, A Betsileosensis

Astacoides species are large for freshwater crayfish, reaching a carapace length of up to 80 millimetres (3.1 in) in the case of A. Betsileoensis. Males and females are similar, except for the organs directly involved in reproduction.Thomas Henry Huxley, in his book The Crayfish, noted that Astacoides has fewer pairs of gills than any other crayfish, with only 12 pairs compared to 21 pairs in Astacopsis.

Habitat and Ecology : Astacoides Betsileosensis is typically found to occur in the deeper-water of slow-flowing rivers at altitudes greater than 1,000m above sea level (Jones et al. 2007). It can also been found in smaller rivers with deep pools. Individuals are normally collected in areas of natural vegetation, although a single specimen has been collected from an irrigation channel in a rice field, and a number of specimens from a pine plantation (Jones et al. 2007). This is a burrowing species (Hobbs 1942) and in the study by Jones et al. (2007) it was found in burrows in sandy banks, up to a meter long with galleries running parallel to the bank.

This is the largest of the Astacoides species, and can reach up to 79 mm carapace length (CL) (Jones et al. 2007). Eggs are laid in June or July, and carried for approximately 4 months, hatching in October or November. Relative to other species of Astacoides it appears to withhold reproduction until it reaches a larger size, however in this study it was found to be the fastest growing species (Jones et al. 2007). During this same study 50% of females were found to be reproductive at 65mm carapace length.

Sunday, February 19, 2012

Procambarus Erythrops

Procambarus Erythrops

Santa Fe Cave Crayfish
Procambarus Erythrops
Sims Sink Crayfish
Albino Crayfish 
Blind Crayfish







Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Family : Cambaridae
Genus : Procambarus
Species : Procambarus Erythrops


Procambarus Erythrops is an arthropod, or more specifically a crustacean, in the Cambaridae family.

Procambarus Erythrops is commonly known (its common name) as the Santa Fe Cave Crayfish in English.

Procambarus Erythrops is classified as endangered by the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species maintained by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.

Sims Sink Crayfish (Procambarus erythrops) SSC 1 - The Sims sink crayfish, sometimes called the Santa Fe cave crayfish, is a  blind, Albino Crayfish that swims through the inky depths of Sims Sink in northern Florida. A medium-sized  white crayfish with reduced eyes, each of which bears a reddish pigment spot, Sims sink crayfish have an average body length of 3.5 inches. These colorless crustaceans are among the few creatures that have adapted to the lightless world at the bottom of the region's aquifers, springs, and sinkholes. Many species who make their homes in these freshwater labyrinths are endemic to only a handful of aquifers and are found nowhere else in the world.

Procambarus Econfinae

Procambarus Econfinae

Panama City Crayfish

Procambarus Econfinae
Panama City Crayfish

Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Family : Cambaridae
Genus : Procambarus
Species : Procambarus Econfinae





Procambarus econfinae, sometimes called the Panama City crayfish, is a species of crayfish in the family Cambaridae. It is only found around Panama City, Florida, and is listed as an endangered species on the IUCN Red List.
 
Panama City Crayfish (Procambarus econfinae) SSC 1 - Panama City crayfish is a species that exists only in a small area of Bay County, Florida. The crayfish is listed as a species of special concern and protected by the state of Florida, though not by the federal government. Land development is the primary cause of the species decline. Since much of the crayfish’s natural habitat no longer exists, it is necessary to conserve the remaining habitat.


Justification :
Procambarus econfinae
has been assessed as Endangered under criterion B1ab(iii). This species has an estimated extent of occurrence of 2,500 km2, and a severely fragmented distribution. Furthermore, it is experiencing a continuing decline in quality of habitat from groundwater abstraction and urban development. Further research is required to determine the abundance of this species, and the extent to which it is being impacted upon by threats within its range. In addition, site protection is required to prevent further degradation of the habitat of this species.

Range Description : This sprecies is found in the environs of Panama City, Bay County, Florida (Hobbs 1989). Within this area, its distribution is severely fragmented. Its range is bounded on three sides by the St. Andrews Bay system, and on the East by Callaway Creek and Bayou (K. Crandall pers. comm. 2009). This species has an estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) of approximately 2,500 km2.

Countries Native : United States (Florida)

Habitat and Ecology :  This species is found in coastal plain flatwood forests, ditches and temporary ponds. Furthermore, it is a secondary burrower (Hobbs 1989).

Saturday, February 18, 2012

Procambarus Pictus

Procambarus Pictus

Procambarus Pictus

Spotted Royal Crayfish


Procambarus Pictus
Black Creek Crayfish
Spotted Royal Crayfish

Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Family : Cambaridae
Genus : Procambarus
Species : Procambarus Pictus

Common Name/s: English - Black Creek Crayfish, Spotted Royal Crayfish

Procambarus Pictus, sometimes called the Black Creek crayfish or spotted royal crayfish, is a species of crayfish in family Cambaridae. It is endemic to Florida, where it is found in the Black Creek river system, the St. Johns River, and the upper Etoniah Creek.


Justification:
Procambarus pictus has been assessed as Near Threatened. This species almost meets the requirements for Endangered under Criteria B, as it has an extent of occurrence of 1,600 km² and is endemic to the Black Creek river system. There is a reported continuing decline in the quality of this species habitat due to ecosystem modification and ongoing habitat destruction and degradation, however this species is known from a number of collection localities where there appears to be genetic interchange. Further research is needed to determine over how much of its range it is undergoing a decline and therefore if it warrants listing in a threatened category. 


Range Description : This species is known from several small tributaries of Black Creek in Clay County, a tributary to the St. Johns River in Duval County, Florida (Franz and Franz 1979). It is also reported from Putnam County (NatureServe 2009), in the upper Etoniah Creek system (P. Moler pers. comm. 2010). It is known from three stream systems (Black and Etoniah creeks, and a small stream near Fort Caroline). There have been many collecting sites (over 30, mostly in Black Creek) within these systems. In addition, potential gene flow probably occurs among most or all sites within each system (K. Crandall pers. comm. 2009). This species has a distribution of approximately 1,600 km². 


Native: United States (Florida)


Black Creek Crayfish
Black Creek Crayfish (Procambarus pictus) SSC- Restricted to a few small stream systems in Clay, Duval, and Putnam counties in the northeastern part of the state of Florida, the black creek crayfish  most known localities are within the Black and Rice creek drainages. This crayfish is medium-sized, growing up to 3 inches long and has a distinctive pattern of yellowish to white spots and stripes on a dark brown to black carapace, and a rust-colored abdomen with dark cross-bands. Crayfish hide during the day in submerged vegetation, roots, and detritus, but can often be seen crawling along the stream bottom at night

Engaeus Yabbimunna

Burnie Burrowing Crayfish

Engaeus Yabbimunna



Engaeus Yabbimunna
Burnie Burrowing Crayfish


Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Infraorder : Astacidea
Family : Parastacidae
Genus : Engaeus

Species : Engaeus Yabbimunna

Engaeus Yabbimunna was unknown until 1992, when a population was located at Burnie on the North West Coast of Tasmania (Doran & Richards, 1996). For this reason E. yabbimunna was given the name "Burnie Burrowing Crayfish". E. yabbimunna is distinguished from similar species by slight morphological differences including the presence of only one row of tubercules ("bumps") on the chelae ("claws"), an upturned spine on the rostrum and the pattern of pores on the sternum (Horwitz, 1994).

Doran and Richards (1996) note that E. yabbimunna live in burrows which always reach the water table. This corresponds to Horwitz & Richardson's (1986) Type 2 burrows. The species is thought to feed on rotting vegetation and perhaps aquatic macroinvertebrates (Doran & Richards, 1996). At the time of its discovery in 1994, it was considered to have an extremely restricted distribution and was initially known from only three creeks in the Burnie area ((Doran & Richards, 1996). However, further work has revealed a wider distribution, with the species having been recently identified from several catchments west of Burnie (J. Nelson, A.M.M. Richardson, pers. comm.). Nevertheless, E. yabbimunna is considered to be a rare species whose survival is threatened by many pressures, including habitat removal and disturbance as well as decreased water quality (Doran & Richards, 1996).

Marist Regional College's Burnie Burrowing Crayfish Project consisted of a group of  Year 10 students who monitored water quality and mapped vegetation and the distribution of crayfish burrows along a creek flowing through the City of Burnie. The aim of the project was to assess the habitat available to E. yabbimunna in the area with a view to developing a recovery plan for the species.



The Burnie Burrowing Crayfish is a freshwater crayfish which grows to an average of 6 cm long. This species is distinctive as it has only one row of tubercles on the back of the claw, a smooth 'palm' of the claw and an upturned tip of the rostrum (projection between the eyes) (Bryant & Jackson 1999).

Australian DistributionThe Burnie Burrowing Crayfish is known only from Burnie and the area immediately to the west, in Tasmania. The species was first discovered in 1992 in Burnie Park. It has been recorded at 34 sites in Shorewell, Romaine, Cooee, Seabrook, Camp and Distillery Creeks (Doran 1999b; Doran & Richards 1996). The extent of occurrence is 130 km² (Richardson et al. 2006).

The species has a fragmented distribution, as only those subpopulations in Romaine Creek are interconnected (Doran & Richards 1996).

Population InformationThe population size of the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish has been estimated at 229 000 to 1 650 000. This was calculated using the density/occupancy estimates determined for the related Scottsdale Burrowing Crayfish (Engaeus spinicaudatus) coupled with known locations and projected habitat for the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish (Doran 1999b).

Land Tenure of PopulationsThe Burnie Burrowing Crayfish is not known to occur in any conservation reserves (Doran 1999b).

HabitatThe Burnie Burrowing Crayfish prefers well covered, slowly draining strips of fern dominated native riparian vegetation. It is known from stream banks and seepages retaining remnant riparian vegetation within Burnie, and, outside the city, in open and grassy sheep pasture, farm dams, roadside seeps and culverts, sedgey marsh, and some moderately disturbed stream sides (Doran 1999b).

The Burnie Burrowing Crayfish usually constructs burrows which are connected to the water table (Doran 1999b). Burrows can be complex and extensive and may often be the product of several generations of crayfish activity (Doran & Richards 1996).

Life CycleBurrowing crayfish live their entire lives within their burrow systems (DPIW 2007). Males and females are not found in the same burrow system (Horwitz 1990a). They occasionally appear on the surface at night and in damp, overcast conditions. All burrowing crayfish have gills under their carapace, making them dependent on water to breathe (DPIW 2007).

Burnie Burrowing Crayfish are believed to mate in early September (Doran 1999b). Females have been found in early December carrying eggs in an early stage of development under their tails (Doran 1999b).

FeedingBurrowing crayfish feed on rotting wood, detritus, root material and occasional animals material (Bryant & Jackson 1999b). Ferns (Dicksonia antarctica), tea-tree, other vegetable material and aquatic invertebrates are likely food sources for the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish (Doran & Richards 1996).

Movement Patterns
Breeding and dispersal between different subpopulation of the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish is likely to be very limited in most cases (Doran & Richards 1996).

Species identification
In areas where only one burrowing crayfish species occurs, the presence of crayfish burrows confirms the presence of that species. However, in some areas, more than one crayfish species may be present (that is, the species occur together). In an area of overlapping distributions, further investigation is needed once burrows have been located to determine the species occupying a particular microhabitat. This will usually involve burrow excavation. Burrow excavation surveys must be designed and implemented in a way that minimises the disturbance to habitat at the site and should only be conducted in consultation with burrowing crayfish experts. Survey methodology should include protocols for appropriate hygiene controls to avoid the spread of pathogens such as chytrid fungus and Phytophthora in crayfish habitat. Permits may be needed for burrow excavation surveys (Tasmanian Burrowing Crayfish Workshop 2010).

ThreatsWater pollution, water diversion and habitat removal are the greatest threats to the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish (Doran 1999b). Removal of vegetation from creek banks is likely to reduce the food available to this species (Doran & Richards 1996).

The species is thought to be particularly threatened by processes associated with increasing urbanisation and industrial pollution in the Burnie urban area. Populations are also threatened by agricultural and forestry activities through changes to hydrology, construction of dams and roads, streamside land clearance, soil compaction, sedimentation and changes to water quality (LEC 2007).

Due to its limited dispersal capacity, the Burnie Burrowing Crayfish is at risk from inbreeding depression. It is also less likely to be able to recolonise areas in which the local subpopulation has become extinct (Doran & Richards 1996).


Engaeus Yabbimunna Distribution Map

Monday, February 6, 2012

Engaeus Orramakunna

Engaeus Orramakunna


Tasmania's Freshwater Burrowing Crayfish
Mt. Arthur Burrowing Crayfish
Mount Arthur Burrowing Crayfish
Burrowing Crayfish
E. Orramakunna
Engaeus Orramakunna

Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Infraorder : Astacidea
Family : Parastacidae
Genus : Engaeus

Species : Engaeus Orramakunna



The Mount Arthur Burrowing Crayfish grows to 8 cm long. It is orange in colour and is paler on its underside and darker on its back. Younger animals may vary from dark reddish-brown to translucent grey-blue in colour (Bryant & Jackson 1999b). The species has long antenna which extend well beyond the edge of the carapace (LEC 2003).

Australian Distribution
The Mount Arthur Burrowing Crayfish is known from a range of 300 km² centred on Mount Arthur in north-east Tasmania. Its occupancy within its range is not well known, however, suitable habitat is common. The species extends to near Lilydale, Nabowla and south Springfield. Its range borders on distributions of other freshwater crayfish, including Engaeus tayatea, E. nulloporius, E. mairener and E. leptorhynchus. The species is also found near Launceston, although its exact boundary remains undefined. The north-east extreme of its distribution extends into an area of significant biological diversity and evolutionary importance for burrowing crayfish and Tasmanian fauna as a whole (Horwitz 1996, cited in Doran 1999b). Approximately 55% of the species' northern distribution occurs in state forests. A comprehensive review of the species distribution can be found in Doran and Richards (1996).

Population Information
The number of adult individuals is estimated to be 1 400 000 to 4 000 000. Since European settlement the species is considered to have undergone a substantial reduction in numbers (60–66%) due to human disturbance (TSSC 2001af).

Habitat
The Mount Arthur Burrowing Crayfish has been found in high abundance in a range of habitats. These include undisturbed rainforests, eucalypt forest, open pasture, cattle trampled pasture and roadside gutters. The primary habitat requirement appears to be a high level of moisture combined with soil suitable for burrowing.
Engaeus Orramakunna distribution
There is no uniform distribution of burrows throughout the species' habitat. In some sites burrows are uniformly distributed, while in others they are patchy (Doran & Richards 1996). Burrows are found in steep sided banks, steep stream slopes and flat marshy seeps and pans. Burrows are commonly found in areas with high canopy cover, high ground cover or low canopy cover and low ground cover and all combinations of these sites. Burrows are recorded in both open and closed habitat. Despite the ad hoc distribution and habitat or burrow location, all active burrows were found in sites of high soil moisture and high clay content (DPIW 2007b). The species occupies burrow types connected to the water table and types independent of the water table, which are dependant on surface runoff (Horwitz & Richardson 1986). In the southern regions of the species' range the soil character changes, becoming darker topsoils with an underlying reddy-grey clay (Doran & Richards 1996).

Burrows are usually found in the presence of ferns such as Dicksonia antarctica. They are also found under a range of canopy species, including eucalypt, tea-tree, paperbarks, Radiata Pine (Pinus radiata) and Sassafras (Atherosperma moschatum) (Doran & Richards 1996). A comprehensive review of the species' habitat can be found in Doran and Richards (1996).

Life Cycle
Burrowing crayfish live their entire lives within burrow systems, only emerging occasionally at night and in damp, overcast conditions. All burrowing crayfish have gills under the carapace, making them dependent on water to breathe (DPIW 2007).
The Mount Arthur Burrowing Crayfish is believed to begin breeding in late May. Females of the species have been found carrying undifferentiated eggs in mid-June, early August, late October and early November. Males have been observed occupying the same burrow as females throughout these periods (Doran 1999b).

Engaeus Martiginer

Engaeus Martiginer


Tasmania's Freshwater Burrowing Crayfish
Furneaux burrowing crayfish 
E. Martiginer
Engaeus Martiginer


Kingdom : Animalia
Phylum : Arthropoda
Subphylum : Crustacea
Class : Malacostraca
Order : Decapoda
Infraorder : Astacidea
Family : Parastacidae
Genus : Engaeus

Species : Engaeus Martiginer

Tasmania has a rich freshwater crayfish fauna with approximately 37 species in 4 genera. They range from the world's largest freshwater crayfish, the Giant Freshwater Lobster (Astacopsis gouldi) weighing up to 6 kg, to the tiny burrowing crayfish of the Engaeus genus, with a maximum length of 10cm. Within the Engaeus genus there are 15 known species (with another possible new species under investigation), 13 of which occur only in Tasmania, and two we share with Victoria.

The burrowing crayfish of the genus Engaeus (pronounced En-GAY-Us), found only in south-eastern Australia, are very specialised crayfish living in tunnel systems in muddy banks, seepages and peaty areas. While most freshwater crayfish live in flowing water, the burrowing crayfish live their entire life within their burrow systems, only venturing out occasionally at night and in damp, overcast conditions. As they are typically no longer free-swimming, many of the species have much reduced tails as can be seen in the picture above. Other features of the genus include a narrow body and, unique among Tasmanian genera, claws that open vertically rather than horizontally to the body, allowing for larger claws in the confined space of narrow tunnels.


As all crayfish have gills under their carapace (shell), they are dependent on water to breathe. Typically the tunnels of burrowing crayfish reach down to the water table and over the summer period when the water table drops, they will follow it down through well established tunnels, sometimes to depths of 2-3 metres.

Burrowing crayfish generally eat decaying organic matter in the soil, such as rotting leaves and twigs but will supplement their diet with the occasional small worm or grub they come across.

All species of Engaeus construct characteristic ‘chimneys’ made from balls of mud placed at the entrance of their burrow. These may range from just a few mud pellets or a structure to 40 cm in height, but we don’t really know why they build them!

Over dry periods, they will often plug the chimney, possibly to retain moisture within the burrow.

Breeding takes place from spring through to early summer. During this period adult females can be found carrying eggs or new hatchlings under the tail, which is closed over them to form a pocket for protection.

Each species has slightly different habitat requirements so that although a couple of different species may be found on the one property, they will inhabit specific areas depending on water flow, soil type, vegetation and degree of habitat disturbance.

Living their lives underground makes the burrowing crayfish extremely difficult to study without disturbing them. As a result there is still much to learn on the life history and requirements of the different species.

Engaeus Martiginer

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

ProcambarusPaeninsulanus

Procambarus Paeninsulanus


Procambarus Paeninsulanus 
Penisula Crayfish
Procambarus Penisula  

Procambarus paeninsulanus This species is from the panhandle of Florida. It is not easy to  distinguish from P. clarkii ( Keith A. Crandall, 2000. personal information ).

Range Description:
This species is found in southern Georgia, and Florida from the Choctawhatchee Basin east and south to Flagler, Marion, and Hillsboro Counties (Hobbs 1942). This species has a distribution of approximately 96,000 km2.

Countries Native:
United States (Florida, Georgia)

Procambarus Paeninsulanus Blue

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Cherax Sp Blue Mountain

Cherax Sp Blue Mountain

Cherax Sp
Cherax Blue Mountain
Cherax Sp Blue Mountain

I get great picture from wiki, but i can't gat enough information about this species, only known this species from New South Wales, Australia

Sunday, January 8, 2012

Astacus Pachypus

Astacus Pachypus
Astacus Pachypus
Thick-clawed Crayfish
Caspian Crayfish
Dneiper-Bug Lagoon

Kingdom Animalia
Phylum ARTHROPODA
Subphylum Crustacea
Class Malacostraca
Order Decapoda
Family Astacidae
Genus Astacus

Scientific name Astacus Pachypus

Synonyms Astacus Pachypus :
Astacus Caspius Eichwald, 1841
Caspiastacus Pachypus (Rathke, 1837)
Pontastacus Pachypus (Rathke, 1837)
Potamobius Pachypus (Rathke, 1837)

Common Name/s Astacus Pachypus :
English - Thick-clawed Crayfish
Ukraine - Dneiper-Bug Lagoon

Countries Native Astacus Pachypus:
Azerbaijan; Kazakhstan; Russian Federation; Turkmenistan; Ukraine

Presence uncertain Astacus Pachypus :
Bulgaria; Georgia

Astacus Pachypus, the Caspian crayfish is a species of crayfish found in the Caspian Sea, the Don river, and parts of the Black Sea and Sea of Azov,where it lives in salinities of up to 14‰.  Astacus Pachypus  is listed as Data Deficient in the IUCN Red List.

Astacus Pachypus is indigenous to Russia, Ukraine, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan (Machino and Holdich 2006; Holdich et al. 2009). In Azerbaijan it is known from the coastal waters off Baku (Holdich 2002); in Kazakhastan this species is known from the coastal waters of the Caspian Sea (Sokolsky et al. 1999); in Turkmenistan it is known from coastal waters (Cherkashina 1999a); in the Ukraine  Astacus Pachypus  is known from the Dneiper-Bug Lagoon of the Azov-Black Sea Basin (Cherkashina 1999b). This species appears to be absent from the northern Caspian Sea which may be as a result of oil pollution (Souty-Grosset et al. 2006).

Astacus Pachypus was once reported from Bulgaria (Skurdal and Taugbøl 2001) however this is believed to be an error and there have since been no further reports of this species (A. Zaikov and G. Grozev pers. comm. 2002 cited in Holdich 2002).

Conservation Actions Astacus Pachypus : Astacus pachypus is listed as a species in 'danger of extinction', in the Red Data Book of the Region of Rostov in Russia (Souty-Grosset et al. 2006).

Monitoring of population numbers is needed to determine at what rate this species is declining globally. Further research on current threats is needed.

Astacus Pachypus / Caspian Crayfish


Saturday, January 7, 2012

Astacus Leptodactylus

Astacus Leptodactylus Red Color
Astacus Leptodactylus
Iran Crayfish
Turkish Crayfish
Danube Crayfish
Galican Crayfish
Long-clawed Crayfish
Narrow-clawed Crayfish
Pond Crayfish
Slender-clawed Crayfish
Swamp Crayfish


Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Family: Astacidae
Genus: Astacus
Species: Astacus Leptodactylus


Common name Astacus Leptodactylus

English : Danube Crayfish, Galican Crayfish, Long-clawed Crayfish, Narrow-clawed Crayfish, Pond Crayfish, Slender-clawed Crayfish, Swamp Crayfish, Turkish Crayfish
French : Écrevisse á Pattes Grêles, Écrevisse des Manais, Écrevisse Turque
Rusian : Pontastacus kessleri


Temp : 6 - 24 Celcius

Astacus Leptodactylus Averages 15-30 cm total length. The side of the thorax is rough and pale yellow to green in colour. The claws Astacus Leptodactylus are long and narrow. The upper surface is rough.

Astacus Leptodactylus can grow up to 30 centimetres (12 in) in length from the tip of the rostrum to the end of the telson (tail), but is more commonly found at around 15 cm (6 in) in length. The sides of the thorax are very rough, usually pale yellow to pale green in colour. Astacus Leptodactylus has two pairs of post-orbital ridges, the second of which may have spines. It also has a prominent tubercle (small nodule) on shoulder of the carapace. The claws of Astacus Leptodactylus are long and narrow (hence the common name 'narrow-clawed crayfish'). Their upper surface is rough and the underside is the same colour as the body. A tubercle can be found on the fixed side of the claw. Astacus Leptodactylus can be distinguished most easily from the European or broad-fingered crayfish, Astacus Astacus, by the relatively thinner "fingers" of the claws.


Astacus Leptodactylus in Iran
Iranian native crayfish includes one crayfish species, Astacus Leptodactylus, with two subspecies, A. l. leptodactylus (lives in freshwater) and A. l. eichwaldi (lives in the Caspian Sea with 12 ppt salinity). Only A. leptodactylus is commonly distributed in Iranian water resources. Nearly 80 years ago local fishermen started to catch Anzali Lagoon crayfish and sold them to foreigners and embassy employees. The consumption of crayfish in Iran is very low, approximately 1 t annually. The first commercially significant crayfish harvest in Iran was 11.3 t from Anzali Lagoon in 1985. It was carried out by a Turkish company. In 1985, the introduction of  Astacus Leptodactylus  was started into suitable Iranian freshwaters. For example, crayfish from Anzali Lagoon were introduced into Arass water reservoir in 1985. Today, Arass water reservoir is the main resource of crayfish in Iran. There was no further crayfish harvest in Iran until 1993. In that year, a private Iranian company began harvesting the Iranian crayfish and exporting them to European countries. In 1993, 3.2 t of crayfish were exported from Iran. Although there have been fluctuations between years, the export of crayfish in Iran increased remarkably after 1996. The successful results of crayfish introductions gave rise to this increase. In 2003, the export of A. leptodactylus from Iran reached the maximum level (216 t). The commercial value of exported crayfish between 2000 and 2009 varied from 1.5–2.5 million US$ annually and its amount was 106–211.5 t. However, there was a reduction in the export of A. leptodactylus from Iran after 2003, to just above 100 t. In conclusion, in order to increase crayfish production in Iran, introduction of A. leptodactylus into suitable water resources, and management, conservation and monitoring of present crayfish populations should be carried out.



Range Description Astacus Leptodactylus :  This is a widespread species and can be found throughout Europe, eastern Russia, and the middle east. However it is absent from some of the northern European countries such as Norway and Sweden, and the southern European countries Spain and Portugal (Souty-Grosset et al. 2006). It is considered indigenous in the eastern part of its range, but has been introduced into many of the western European countries (Machino and Holdich 2006, Souty-Grosset et al. 2006)


Native Astacus Leptodactylus :
Austria; Azerbaijan; Belarus; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Georgia; Greece; Hungary; Iran, Islamic Republic of; Israel; Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Moldova; Romania; Russian Federation; Serbia; Slovakia; Turkey (Turkey-in-Asia, Turkey-in-Europe); Turkmenistan; Ukraine

Astacus Leptodactylus is fairly docile, especially the male with large claws, and favours relatively still waters such as lakes and canals. It is listed as a species of Least Concern on the IUCN Red List


Astacus Leptodactylus



Astacus Leptodactylus Blue

Astacus Leptodactylus Brown

Astacus Leptodactylus Blue

Astacus Astacus

Astacus Astacus
Astacus Astacus
European Crayfish
Noble Crayfish
Broad-Fingered Crayfish


Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Family: Astacidae
Genus: Astacus
Species: Astacus Astacus



Common Name  Astacus Astacus  :
English Noble Crayfish, Broad-clawed Crayfish, Broad-fingered Crayfish, European Crayfish, Red-clawed Crayfish, Red-footed Crayfish, River Crayfish
French Écrevisse á Pattes Rouges, Écrevisse Fluviatile, Écrevisse Noble



Size Length of male: 16 cm 
Length of female: 12 cm 



Astacus (from the Greek αστακός, astacós, meaning "Lobster" or "Crayfish"/"Crawfish") is a genus of Crayfish found in Europe and western Asia, comprising three extant and four extinct species.
Due to the American crayfish plague, crayfish of this genus have been almost wiped out in Europe and have in many European countries been replaced by the North American signal crayfish, which is often more resistant to the plague


Astacus Astacus, the "European Crayfish", "Noble Crayfish" or "Broad-Fingered Crayfish", is the most common species of crayfish in Europe, and a traditional foodstuff. Like other crayfish, Astacus Astacus is restricted to fresh water, living only in unpolluted streams, rivers and lakes. It is found from France throughout Central Europe, to the Balkan peninsula, and north as far as parts of the British Isles, Scandinavia, and the western parts of the former Soviet Union. Males may grow up to 16 cm long, and females up to 12 cm.

The Noble Crayfish, Astacus Astacus, is indigenous and widespread throughout Europe. This species range extends from Russia and the Ukraine in the east, to Finland, Sweden, Norway in the north, to Greece in the south, and the United Kingdom and France in the west. A few recently introduced subpopulations are found outside Europe, for example Morocco. The occurrence of this species within Andorra, Cyprus, the UK, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Morocco and possibly Montenegro and Italy, is via introductions from neighbouring countries.


Astacus Astacus was once abundant in Europe, although it was expensive to buy, and is considered to be the finest edible crayfish. It is, however, susceptible to the crayfish plague carried by the invasive American species signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus), and is therefore listed as a vulnerable species on the IUCN Red List.
Documentation of the consumption of  Astacus Astacus dates back to the Middle Ages, when it was popular among the Swedish nobility, spreading to all social classes by the 17th and 18th centuries due to its ready availability. The crayfish are collected from the wild in traps, a practice which is being replaced by more intensive aquaculture of the signal crayfish in man-made ponds. The consumption of crayfish is an important part of traditional Scandinavian culture, including the crayfish party or kräftskiva, a feast to mark the end of summer



Native Astacus Astacus :
Andorra; Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Latvia; Lithuania; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Moldova; Netherlands; Poland; Romania; Russian Federation (Kaliningrad); Serbia; Slovakia; Slovenia; Switzerland


Astacus Astacus varies in colour from green or blue to brown and sometimes black. The undersides of the claws are dark red. The head and internal organs of all crayfish are protected by the carapace and the six segments of the abdomen are individually encased with a flexible membrane between them to allow movement. Crayfish have a pair of large claws at the front end, followed by four pairs of walking legs and then four pairs of small swimming legs called swimmerets. These swimmerets are covered with fine hairs to which the female attaches her eggs. A central tail flap is surrounded by four other flaps that are used to move the crayfish rapidly through the water, as well as curling up to form a brood chamber. There are two eyes on the end of eyestalks, but the senses of touch and taste are far more important, and are perceived using a pair of large feelers (or antennae) and a pair of small, fine, centrally located feelers (or antennules).

Astacus Astacus Male

Astacus Astacus Female
The males have often longer and stronger claws than the females and the abdomen is visibly larger at the females. In order to precisely distinguish the males from the females, especially when we are talking about young crayfish or juveniles, one may verify the sternal plate and the pleopods to be sure. Male crayfish have the first couple of pleopods strong and oriented towards the front while the female has all the pleopods equal.


Astacus Astacus
Astacus Astacus

Astacus Astacus


Astacus Astacus

Thursday, January 5, 2012

Procambarus Capillatus

Procambarus Capillatus



Common Name : Capillaceous Crayfish, Alabama Crayfish, Alabama Crawfish



Kingdom :     Animalia
Phylum :     Arthropoda
Subphylum :     Crustacea
Class :     Malacostraca
Order :     Decapoda
Superfamily : Astacoidea
Family :     Cambaridae
Genus :     Procambarus
Species :     Procambarus Capillatus / Procambarus (Leconticambarus) Capillatus

Procambarus Capillatus.  Distribution: North America: Escambia River system in Alabama and Florida (Hobbs 1989). Alabama: Known only from the Escambia River system.  Habitat: Lentic environments; secondary burrower.  

Conservation Status Procambarus Capillatus : High Conservation Concern.

Type Locality
Drainage ditch adjacent to Burnt Corn Creek (Escambia River drainage) on State Route 41 northwest of Brewton, Escambia County, Alabama.

Range
Escambia River basin in Conecuh, Escambia, and Monroe counties, Alabama, and Escambia County, Florida.

Range Description : Procambarus Capillatus  is found in the Escambia River basin in Conecuh, Escambia, and Monroe Counties, Alabama, and Escambia County, Florida (Hobbs 1971).

Native Procambarus Capillatus :
United States (Alabama, Florida)

Monday, December 26, 2011

Procambarus Ablusus

Procambarus Ablusus


Procambarus Ablusus
Other Name : Hatchie River Crayfish

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Superfamily: Astacoidea
Family: Cambaridae
Genus: Procambarus
Species:  Procambarus Ablusus /  Procambarus (Penides) Ablusus

Habitat/Native of Procambarus Ablusus : United State (Tennessee - Mississippi)

Procambarus Ablusus is found in the Hatchie River system in Hardeman, Hardin, and McNairy Counties, Tennessee, and Alcorn, Tippah, Tishomingo and Union Counties, Mississippi (Adams 2008).  Procambarus Ablusus  has a distribution of approximately 14500 km2



Procambarus Advena

Procambarus Advena

Procambarus Advena

Other Name : Vidalia Crayfish

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Superfamily: Astacoidea
Family: Cambaridae
Genus: Procambarus
Species: Procambarus Advena

Native : United State (Georgia)

Lifespan of Procambarus Advena : 3 - 4 Years

The species was split into two taxa by Hobbs (1981), and Florida records are now considered to be for Procambarus Talpoides. As pointed out by Faxon (1884:140), the descriptions of  Procambarus Advena  and C. carolinus were transposed in Hagen's monograph, and pl. 1:figs. 51-54 and pl. 3:fig. 165 are actually of  Procambarus Advena. (see. Hobbs, 1981:311 for a detailed bibliography and explanation).

Procambarus Advena has been assessed as Least Concern. It has a fairly wide distribution, and is believed to be common within its range. Further research is needed to determine the population status of this species, and whether it is being impacted upon by any major threat processes.

This species is a regional endemic in Georgia, and occurs in three drainages with a total range of between 5000 to 20000 km2 (A. Eversole pers. comm. 2009). This species inhabits the lower coastal plain of Georgia, between the Savannah, Oconee and Altamaha rivers (Hobbs 1981). It is generally restricted to North of the Altamaha River (A. Eversole pers. comm. 2009).


Cherax SP Blue

Cherax Sp Blue / Papua Yabby / Blue Crayfish



Cherax Sp Blue
The Blue Papua Crayfish
Cherax Holthuisi 
Cherax Holthuisi Blue
Cherax Blue
Cherax Blue Knight
Blue Crayfish
Huna Biru
Lobster Biru
Papua Blue

Local Name in Papua : Huna / Huna Blue, Huna Biru, Lobster Biru
Indonesian Name : Blue Papua
Other name : Papua Yabby, Blue Papua Yabby

Kingdom:     Animalia
Phylum:     Arthropoda
Subphylum:     Crustacea
Class:     Malacostraca
Order:     Decapoda
Family:     Parastacidae
Genus:     Cherax
Subgenus:     Cherax
Species:     Cherax Holthuisi

Habitat : Papua, Irian Jaya, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea
Water Temperature : 22 - 28 derajat celcius

Size in Natural : Up to 15 gram 81–93 mm (3.2–3.7 in)

Male Large then Female

Blue / Soft Blue in Body Color

Cherax Holthuisi / Cherax Sp Blue  is a species of crayfish from the Bird's Head Peninsula in New Guinea. It grows to a total length of 81–93 mm (3.2–3.7 in). It was described in 2006 after animals circulating in the aquarium trade could not be assigned to any known species.

The total length of Cherax Holthuisi is 81–93 millimetres (3.2–3.7 in). In the wild, it is Drak Blue,Blue or soft blue, although Orange varieties are also sold in the aquarium trade. It is chiefly differentiated from the other species in the genus Cherax by the form of the rostrum, the shape of the claws and the small size of its eyes. In  Cherax Holthuisi / Cherax Sp Orange , the rostrum has two indentations on each side, and several indistinct lobes; in most other species, there are 3–8 teeth on the rostrum

Distribution and habitat
In the wild, Cherax Holthuisi / Cherax Sp Blue has only been recorded from Aitinjo Lake (1°25′28″S 132°22′22″E) on the Bird's Head Peninsula at the western end of New Guinea, in the Indonesian province of West Papua. The lake is 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) long and up to 350 metres (1,150 ft) wide, and is surrounded by steep mountains.  Cherax Holthuisi / Cherax Sp Blue  has been listed as Data Deficient on the IUCN Red List, pending better knowledge of its biology.

Specimens of  Cherax Holthuisi / Cherax Sp Blue and Cherax Sp Orange were collected in 1952, when M. Boeseman bought nine individuals from locals on the shores of Lake Aitinjo. They were deposited in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie (now part of Naturalis) as lots RMNH D 51503 and RMNH D 51504. The species remained undescribed, however, until Christian Lukhaup and Reinhard Pekny attempted to identify some exotic crayfish then on the market in Germany. Their specimens did not accord with any of the nine species described from New Guinea by Lipke Holthuis, but did match Boeseman's undescribed specimens. Lukhaup and Pekny therefore described the new species in a 2006 publication in Zoologische Mededelingen and called it Cherax Holthuisi in honour of Lipke Holthuis. One juvenile was later discovered among specimens described as the new species Cherax boesemani in 2008.

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Cherax Tenuimanus

Cherax Tenuimanus Hairy

Cherax Tenuimanus Blue

Cherax Tenuimanus Black
Cherax Tenuimanus
Ausie Blue Yabby
Hairy Marron
Margaret River Marron
Blue Marron

Kingdom:     Animalia
Phylum:     Arthropoda
Subphylum:     Crustacea
Class:     Malacostraca
Order:     Decapoda
Family:     Parastacidae
Genus:     Cherax
Species:     Cherax Tenuimanus

Other Name : Cherax Tenuimanus, Ausie Blue Yabby, Hairy Marron , Margaret River Marron, Blue Marron, Blue Marron Yabby, Margaret River Yabby

Habitat :  Southwestern Australia

Water Temperature : 20 - 27 derajat celcius

pH : 5 - 8

Size in Natural : up to 2,7 Kg



Life Span : 5 - 7 years

One of the largest freshwater crayfish in the world, this hairy-shelled species has jet black pinchers and a paler olive-green to brown body. The hairy marron's (Cherax Tenuimanus) underside is brown and females have areas of red colouration on the underside and some splashes of purple. The head and internal organs of all crayfish are protected by the carapace and the six segments of the abdomen are individually encased with a flexible membrane between them to allow movement. Crayfish have a pair of large pinchers at the front end, followed by four pairs of walking legs and then four pairs of small swimming legs called swimmerets. These swimmerets are covered with fine hairs to which the female attaches her eggs. A central tail flap is surrounded by four other flaps that are used to move the crayfish rapidly through the water, as well as curling up to form a brood chamber in females. There are two eyes on the end of eyestalks, but the senses of touch and taste are far more important. These are perceived using a pair of large feelers (or antennae) and a pair of small, fine, centrally located feelers (or antennules)

Cherax tenuimanus, known as the hairy marron or Margaret River marron, is one of two species of crayfish in Southwestern Australia known as marron. It occupies a narrow range within the southwestern biogeographical region of Margaret River. It is currently listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List,

This species is restricted to the upper reaches of the Margaret River in the south-west of Western Australia (Morgan and Beatty 2005, Bunn 2004). This species is currently only known from 11 sites in an area less than 50 km in length (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2008). The area of occupancy (AOO) for this species is estimated to be less than 10 km² (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts 2008).

Can reach a mass of 2,7kg. Lateral serrations are found on each side of the rostrum and the carapace has a distinct prominence running back from the postorbital spine. The rostrum ends in a sharp spine

Popular Posts

Disclaimer

This Blog is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com All prices are grab on post date, Please check price at stores before you checkout.

Total Pageviews